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Self-Reporting

A legal requirement for Ontario nurses

Reporting is an important component of regulating the nursing profession in Ontario. Reports alert CNO to situations where a nurse may not be practicing safely and allow CNO to take any appropriate steps to protect the public.

A nurse must self-report to CNO if she or he:

  • has been found guilty of any offence in any jurisdiction (except speeding or parking tickets);
  • has been charged with any offence in any jurisdiction;
  • has a finding of professional negligence and/or malpractice;
  • has a finding of professional misconduct, incompetence or incapacity or any similar finding, in relation to the practice of nursing or any other profession in any jurisdiction; and/or
  • is the subject of a current investigation, inquiry or proceeding for professional misconduct, incompetence or incapacity or any similar investigation or proceeding in relation to the practice of nursing or any other profession in any jurisdiction. (Note: Information about CNO proceedings do not need not be reported.)

Failing to self-report is a serious matter and can result in referral to discipline.

CNO does not investigate every self-report received. CNO’s Executive Director reviews the self-report, determines what level of risk may be posed to the public, and makes a decision about an appropriate response. There are many options available to the Executive Director that do not involve an investigation. For example, a nurse may be advised to review practice standards and in some cases, may be asked to meet with a CNO representative to discuss the matter.

To self-report, please consult the Mandatory Reporting Guide and complete the Self-Reporting Form.  For assistance or more information on the reports process, contact CNO at investigations-intake@cnomail.org or 416 963-7504 (toll-free in Canada 1 877 963-7504). 

Page last reviewed August 01, 2019